verticalfiles:

View 003: Eastern Parkway (streetscape, man on horse-drawn carriage in snow), by M.C. Taylor. Lantern slide. Date unknown.

spending the day at a workshop on conservation of glass photos, mostly lantern slides. i have a good job. i love these babies.

I’m assuming this is Eastern Parkway in Brooklyn.

jtotheizzoe:

boop.
This man.

Cannot. Stop. Laughing

explore-blog:

A technical glitch causes the Hubble Space Telescope, which ordinarily captures magnificently crisp scientific imagery of the cosmos, to lose balance and create this inadvertent piece of modern art.

It is suspected that in this case, Hubble had locked onto a bad guide star, potentially a double star or binary. This caused an error in the tracking system, resulting in this remarkable picture of brightly colored stellar streaks. The prominent red streaks are from stars in the globular cluster NGC 288. 

Remarkable. Beautiful.

(via jtotheizzoe)

This is such a cool map of Brooklyn. Usually when you see maps of New York City, they’re oriented so that Manhattan is the focus, with a north/south axis. I have always had trouble envisioning southern Brooklyn, and for some reason this map, with it’s east/west layout helps me understand the layout of Brooklyn better.

(via Fascinating Old Maps of Both Real and Ridiculous NYC Transit Projects - Wired Science)

sunwindsnow:

9.März 2014                        8°C/46°F
Endlich wieder ein sonniges Wochenende! Im Central Park liegt an einigen Stellen noch alter Schnee, aber ganz unerwartet fanden wir auch diese Schneeglöckchen. 

Today’s new favorite Tumblr. I love that snowdrops are called “little snow bells” in German. sunwindsnow:

9.März 2014                        8°C/46°F
Endlich wieder ein sonniges Wochenende! Im Central Park liegt an einigen Stellen noch alter Schnee, aber ganz unerwartet fanden wir auch diese Schneeglöckchen. 

Today’s new favorite Tumblr. I love that snowdrops are called “little snow bells” in German.

sunwindsnow:

9.März 2014                        8°C/46°F

Endlich wieder ein sonniges Wochenende! Im Central Park liegt an einigen Stellen noch alter Schnee, aber ganz unerwartet fanden wir auch diese Schneeglöckchen. 

Today’s new favorite Tumblr. I love that snowdrops are called “little snow bells” in German.

theobservist:

A specially designed police car in the Holland Tunnel, NY.

Patrolmen who regulate the flow of traffic through the Holland Tunnel recently tested a miniature electric car that rolls along the tunnel’s “catwalk”. The car is designed to give the officers greater control over traffic by permitting them to cover tunnel posts faster. It was tested on a 2200-foot run of miniature railroad track. Only two feet wide, the 1300 pound car can be driven in either direction from a swivel seat inside the glass-enclosed cab. Push buttons control the speed at six or twelve miles per hour. A 240-volt, three-horse-power motor powers the car.

From Popular Mechanics Magazine, March 1955

Only marginally less silly than the pseudo-Segways the police drive in the Times Square subway station.

nyhistory:

 #ThrowbackThursday, 1970’s New York City edition:

Bill Cunningham, Editta Sherman on the Train to the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, ca. 1972. Gelatin silver photograph. New-York Historical Society, Gift of the photographer. On view starting Friday in “Bill Cunningham: Facades.”

Flawless.

strandbooks:

Okay, these are a bit much… but I kind of like the Faulkner one. Or maybe I just like Faulkner. Hard to say.

What’s your best literary pick-up line?

The Vonnegut one made me giggle out loud.

What a great story! I played high school basketball in a never ending series of gyms like this, and I just love them! Make me want to head up to the Bronx and catch a Fordham game now.

(via At Fordham, Gym Has History if Not Allure - NYTimes.com)

The Sunday New York Panorama feature in the Times’ Metro section is like a more sedate, less clever, visual version of Metropolitan Diary. I love it.

guardian:

First Brit in space Tim Peake: ‘We phone people because it’s just so cool’

Astronaut talks of life on International Space Station, 3D printing in space, stargazing and his weakness for watches. Read more

Photograph: Tim Peake/ESA

I knew it.

If you’ve ever read Mark Helprin’s epic tale of New York City and the Hudson Valley, Winter’s Tale, you were probably (I hope) captivated by the concept of ice boats. It’s been a long time since the Hudson has frozen solid enough for the elegant vessels to make an appearance. They go so fast, and make such alluring noises, shushing and luffing, they are the epitome of speed and a step back in time. Wonderful!

(via Ice Boats on the Hudson River - NYTimes.com)

jtotheizzoe:

Sit back, relax, and allow yourself to be hypnotized by this microscopic time-lapse video of snowflakes as the are born and evolve their emergent hexagonal complexity. 
This video, embedded below, is the fine work of Vyacheslav Ivanov:

And if you’d like to know more about the science of how snowflakes form and why they look that way, check out this video, from … me:


This has been such a good winter for snowflake gazing. jtotheizzoe:

Sit back, relax, and allow yourself to be hypnotized by this microscopic time-lapse video of snowflakes as the are born and evolve their emergent hexagonal complexity. 
This video, embedded below, is the fine work of Vyacheslav Ivanov:

And if you’d like to know more about the science of how snowflakes form and why they look that way, check out this video, from … me:


This has been such a good winter for snowflake gazing. jtotheizzoe:

Sit back, relax, and allow yourself to be hypnotized by this microscopic time-lapse video of snowflakes as the are born and evolve their emergent hexagonal complexity. 
This video, embedded below, is the fine work of Vyacheslav Ivanov:

And if you’d like to know more about the science of how snowflakes form and why they look that way, check out this video, from … me:


This has been such a good winter for snowflake gazing.

jtotheizzoe:

Sit back, relax, and allow yourself to be hypnotized by this microscopic time-lapse video of snowflakes as the are born and evolve their emergent hexagonal complexity. 

This video, embedded below, is the fine work of Vyacheslav Ivanov:

And if you’d like to know more about the science of how snowflakes form and why they look that way, check out this video, from … me:

This has been such a good winter for snowflake gazing.

I just started this book, and let me tell you, this is one of those books best read on a Kindle. Otherwise you will need to have your phone or a dictionary near to hand. There are a whole lot of words in there you may not be familiar with, unless you are a specialist in 7th-century Britain that is.

(via On Hild and The Joys of Situating)

ancientfaces:

Vintage Life Size Doll

This doll is so big it actually has a doll of its own! Any ideas when this might have been taken? [ Image: Hazel with vintage life size doll ]

One of the fabulous things about the Internet is that you can publish wonderful old photographs like this, and there is a real possibility that someone will recognize those people and solve a small mystery. Isn’t that neat?