mashable:

Writer and Illustrator October Jones’s Motivational Doodle’s Will Make Your Day
Because sometimes we all need a little inspiration.
mashable:

Writer and Illustrator October Jones’s Motivational Doodle’s Will Make Your Day
Because sometimes we all need a little inspiration.
mashable:

Writer and Illustrator October Jones’s Motivational Doodle’s Will Make Your Day
Because sometimes we all need a little inspiration.
mashable:

Writer and Illustrator October Jones’s Motivational Doodle’s Will Make Your Day
Because sometimes we all need a little inspiration.
mashable:

Writer and Illustrator October Jones’s Motivational Doodle’s Will Make Your Day
Because sometimes we all need a little inspiration.
mashable:

Writer and Illustrator October Jones’s Motivational Doodle’s Will Make Your Day
Because sometimes we all need a little inspiration.
mashable:

Writer and Illustrator October Jones’s Motivational Doodle’s Will Make Your Day
Because sometimes we all need a little inspiration.
mashable:

Writer and Illustrator October Jones’s Motivational Doodle’s Will Make Your Day
Because sometimes we all need a little inspiration.

housingworksbookstore:

"There is no last taste. The fourth stage of grieving is depression. The Goldfinch is over and you are a wastrel now, you must scavenge out the rest of your days reading about people you don’t care about and can’t believe in. Life is pain, Highness. For this penultimate awful crawl through the five stages I recommend nothing. Just watch TV, I guess.”

—Hannah Messler aka theoppositeofeasy for B&N, How to Get Over The Goldfinch

Accurate

This is, without question, one of the more fascinating, subtle, and seemingly convincing Internet “art” pieces I have stumbled across, in well, ever.

mashable:

Mashable asked the editing pros at proofreading site Grammarly to share the 8 most common words misspelled by users.

Mashable asked the editing pros at proofreading site Grammarly to share the 8 words their users most commonly words misspelled.
There. That’s better. See also: Muphry’s Law. mashable:

Mashable asked the editing pros at proofreading site Grammarly to share the 8 most common words misspelled by users.

Mashable asked the editing pros at proofreading site Grammarly to share the 8 words their users most commonly words misspelled.
There. That’s better. See also: Muphry’s Law. mashable:

Mashable asked the editing pros at proofreading site Grammarly to share the 8 most common words misspelled by users.

Mashable asked the editing pros at proofreading site Grammarly to share the 8 words their users most commonly words misspelled.
There. That’s better. See also: Muphry’s Law. mashable:

Mashable asked the editing pros at proofreading site Grammarly to share the 8 most common words misspelled by users.

Mashable asked the editing pros at proofreading site Grammarly to share the 8 words their users most commonly words misspelled.
There. That’s better. See also: Muphry’s Law. mashable:

Mashable asked the editing pros at proofreading site Grammarly to share the 8 most common words misspelled by users.

Mashable asked the editing pros at proofreading site Grammarly to share the 8 words their users most commonly words misspelled.
There. That’s better. See also: Muphry’s Law.

mashable:

Mashable asked the editing pros at proofreading site Grammarly to share the 8 most common words misspelled by users.

Mashable asked the editing pros at proofreading site Grammarly to share the 8 words their users most commonly words misspelled.

There. That’s better. See also: Muphry’s Law.

(via exchangealumni)

Gail is, to this day, still one of my favorite things about the ‘West Wing,’ and there are a lot of things I love about the ‘West Wing.’

(via 'West Wing' Uncensored: POTUS, the Fish and 10 Other Things Left Out of THR's Oral History - Hollywood Reporter)

The bombdiggity list of British TV shows to watch while you’re waiting for the next season of Downton / Miss Fisher / Sherlock to start.

(via Put a cravat on it | Exit, Pursued By A Bear)

I grew up eating half-moon cookies procured in Hudson. I always assumed the name had something to do with Henry Hudson’s ship. I was shocked when I moved to New York City and people called them black & white cookies. I was also disappointed to find them less cakey. I do love the ones they sell at Glaser’s though, I cannot tell a lie.


(via The Black-and-White Cookie’s Curious History - Sietsema - Eater NY)

livelymorgue:

A bold statement between two towering obelisks: A spherical sculpture by Fritz Koenig flouted the hegemony of the straight line, provocatively declaring itself between the World Trade Center buildings. It was one of several abstract outdoor sculptures that made a stand in the mid-’70s. “Among the confusion and hustle of the city, they make a statement,” The Times quoted Doris Freedman, former head of the city’s Department of Cultural Affairs. “They assert an individual presence, they humanize the impersonality of the city,” she said. Photo: Jack Manning/The New York Times 

This is beautiful. livelymorgue:

A bold statement between two towering obelisks: A spherical sculpture by Fritz Koenig flouted the hegemony of the straight line, provocatively declaring itself between the World Trade Center buildings. It was one of several abstract outdoor sculptures that made a stand in the mid-’70s. “Among the confusion and hustle of the city, they make a statement,” The Times quoted Doris Freedman, former head of the city’s Department of Cultural Affairs. “They assert an individual presence, they humanize the impersonality of the city,” she said. Photo: Jack Manning/The New York Times 

This is beautiful.

livelymorgue:

A bold statement between two towering obelisks: A spherical sculpture by Fritz Koenig flouted the hegemony of the straight line, provocatively declaring itself between the World Trade Center buildings. It was one of several abstract outdoor sculptures that made a stand in the mid-’70s. “Among the confusion and hustle of the city, they make a statement,” The Times quoted Doris Freedman, former head of the city’s Department of Cultural Affairs. “They assert an individual presence, they humanize the impersonality of the city,” she said. Photo: Jack Manning/The New York Times

This is beautiful.

windowramblings:

~valbibs . May 2014 . On the road . I-95

Today’s favorite Tumblr.

Martha, the last Passenger Pigeon, goes on display next month in the Smithsonian Libraries’ exhibition “Once There Were Billions: Vanished Birds of North America.”

Pictured: paper Martha. To make your own origami passenger pigeon go to foldtheflock.org - follow our paper Martha as she visits the mall by following the Libraries’ on Instagram.

Via smithsonianlibraries.

climatehaiku:

Mild temps and moisture /
Provide ideal conditions /
For lichen to thrive

mh

Today’s new favorite Tumblr. Apparently I am a sucker for anyone who combines weather with commentary.

livelymorgue:

July 1, 1969: A police officer on duty in the 78th Precinct in Brooklyn, dressed as “a tall, voluptuous broad,” according to the picture’s sensitive caption-writer. While he was “in disguise, two men pinched the undercover man where a woman shouldn’t be pinched, and the undercover man pinched them in return. The second pinch was in the form of an arrest,” the photo’s back reads. And, helpfully, it’s pointed out that the policeman “is married and is the father of one child.” Photo: Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times 

This picture is perfect. The description on the back of the photograph is crazy. Times, they sure have changed. livelymorgue:

July 1, 1969: A police officer on duty in the 78th Precinct in Brooklyn, dressed as “a tall, voluptuous broad,” according to the picture’s sensitive caption-writer. While he was “in disguise, two men pinched the undercover man where a woman shouldn’t be pinched, and the undercover man pinched them in return. The second pinch was in the form of an arrest,” the photo’s back reads. And, helpfully, it’s pointed out that the policeman “is married and is the father of one child.” Photo: Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times 

This picture is perfect. The description on the back of the photograph is crazy. Times, they sure have changed.

livelymorgue:

July 1, 1969: A police officer on duty in the 78th Precinct in Brooklyn, dressed as “a tall, voluptuous broad,” according to the picture’s sensitive caption-writer. While he was “in disguise, two men pinched the undercover man where a woman shouldn’t be pinched, and the undercover man pinched them in return. The second pinch was in the form of an arrest,” the photo’s back reads. And, helpfully, it’s pointed out that the policeman “is married and is the father of one child.” Photo: Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times

This picture is perfect. The description on the back of the photograph is crazy. Times, they sure have changed.

jtotheizzoe:

boop.
This man.

Cannot. Stop. Laughing

explore-blog:

A technical glitch causes the Hubble Space Telescope, which ordinarily captures magnificently crisp scientific imagery of the cosmos, to lose balance and create this inadvertent piece of modern art.

It is suspected that in this case, Hubble had locked onto a bad guide star, potentially a double star or binary. This caused an error in the tracking system, resulting in this remarkable picture of brightly colored stellar streaks. The prominent red streaks are from stars in the globular cluster NGC 288. 

Remarkable. Beautiful.

(via jtotheizzoe)